Wednesday, 31 August 2016

At last… Genocidist ideologue reads the handwriting on the wall

Ango Abdullahi, member of the north Nigeria region’s “elders forum” and one of the “country”’s most virulent Igbophobists/genocidist ideologues in 50 years of the Igbo genocide by Nigeria and strategic ally Britain has, at last, come to terms with the collapse of genocidist Nigeria: see following excerpts from Paul Obi, Peter Omale & Marvellous Okeke, “Nigeria can break up, it’s not indivisible, says Ango Abdullahi”, ThisDay, Lagos, Wednesday 31 August 2016:

“The batures [Europeans, in Hausa, but more pointedly the British in this context] have brought us together … We might not be one ... in terms of language or in terms of geographical location or in terms of customs or in terms of history or in terms of religion and so on but as a people put in one country our first job is to understand one another…

Let’s understand one another. Understanding one another will be the basis for working together … This wish of being one is Utopian because if you look at examples of other parts of the world there’s a lot to learn from…

Take for example India that got independence in 1948 … yet one or two years later Pakistan was created … and in another one or two years [incorrect timeframe  HE-E] … Bangladesh emerged out of Pakistan … because there was insufficient basis on which India would stay together in the first place…

What are we hearing [here in Nigeria]? We’re hearing about the restructuring of Nigeria. We’re hearing about secession, we’re hearing all sorts of things and who are the promoters of this rhetoric … If [foundational British occupation administrator Frederick] Lugard made a mistake in 1914 … let’s correct it now. Why not?

If Nigerians cannot live together and allow peace and development to reign, then let’s go our separate ways and to our different places so that we can concentrate and develop our children and grandchildren in peace. There’s nothing wrong with that.

So many countries have gone through that before. So I don’t believe in all these emotions and sentiments that Nigeria is indissoluble … Take Great Britain, [there’s] been a model for 1,000 years of democracy [incorrect timeframe – HE-E] and then a year or two ago Scotland that had been in the union for about 350 years [incorrect timeframe – HE-E] opted for a referendum to get out; same problem with Ireland...

The Soviet Union was a super power many years ago … today 12 or 13 countries [15 countries in total – HE-E] were created from it … So what is so special about Nigeria? … there is nothing like indissolubility in any country…
(Ornette Coleman Quartet, “Turnaround” [personnel: Coleman, alto saxophone; Don Cherry, trumpet; Red Mitchell, bass; Shelly Manne, drums; recorded: Contemporary’s Studio, Los Angeles, US, 23 February 1959])
 Twitter @HerbertEkweEkwe

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